Posts tagged ‘abelian’

My Son’s New Joke

My son is doing his math homework — he’s in first grade, so it involves writing a certain number, spelling that number, and finding all occurrences of that number in a grid of random numbers called a “Number Hunt.” Based on today’s number, he came up with the following joke:

What number is mostly even but not even?
Eleven.

Not a great joke, to be sure… but as good as most jokes on his dad’s blog, and he’s only six years old.

The homework was frustrating (for me), because my sons are capable of much more.

When my sons ride their bikes through the parking lot, they solve problems involving parking space numbers, the digits on license plates, and other numerical things. They ask me to create “math challenges” for them to think about as they ride. Yesterday, they solved the following three challenges:

  1. Which license plate has the greatest product if you multiply its four digits together? (The license plate format in Virginia is LLL-DDDD, where L is a letter and D is a digit.)
  2. How many different license plates  are possible with the format LLL-DDDD?
  3. Each of the three rows in our parking lot has a different number of cars. If our parking lot had a fourth row, how many cars would there be in the fourth row?

For Question 1, Eli realized that the license plate with {9, 7, 6, 5} would have a greater product than the license plate with {9, 7, 6, 3}, since 5 > 3. But then he realized that {9, 9, 8, 2} would be even greater, and he correctly determined that the product is 1,296.

For Question 2, Alex thought it would be 144. His argument was that there would be 6 ways to arrange the letters and 24 ways to arrange the digits, and 6 × 24 = 144. We talked about this, and I pointed out that his answer would be correct if we knew which three letters and which three digits we were using (and they were all different). He and Eli reconvened and eventually claimed there would be 263 x 104 possible license plates… and being the good father that I am, I let them use the calculator on my phone to find the product.

For Question 3, the number of cars in the three rows was 2, 5, and 8. They extended the pattern and concluded that there would be 11 cars in the non-existent fourth row.

So you can understand why I’d be frustrated that Alex’s homework involved writing the number 11 repeatedly. I thought about telling him not to do it, but then I imagined the following conversation:

Alex: Would you punish me for something I didn’t do?
Teacher: Of course not, Alex.
Alex: Good, because I didn’t do my homework.

Or perhaps he’d just fabricate an excuse:

I thought my homework was abelian, so I figured I could turn it in and then do it.

And finally — should abelian be capitalized?

September 24, 2013 at 5:10 pm 3 comments

Sentences Are Commutative, Words Are Not

While playing Scrabble® on my phone today, I had a rack with following letters:

AABEILN

Near the top of the board was TAVERNA, and it was possible to hook above the first six letters or below the first two letters. There were other spaces on the board to place words, but this was clearly the most fertile. The full board looked like this:

Scrabble-AABEILN

On my rack, the letters weren’t in alphabetical order (as above), so I missed a seven-letter word that would have garnered 78 points. Instead, I played ABLE for a paltry 13 points.

After my turn, the Teacher feature showed me the word I should have played:

ABELIAN

Kickin’ myself. I’ll get over not seeing BANAL, LANAI, or even LEV. But how does a math guy miss ABELIAN? I would not put up a fight if someone wanted to rescind my Math Dorkdom membership card.

What loves letters and commutes?
An abelian Scrabble player.

(That’s a joke. Please don’t play Scrabble while driving.)

February 27, 2012 at 12:34 pm 4 comments


About MJ4MF

The Math Jokes 4 Mathy Folks blog is an online extension to the book Math Jokes 4 Mathy Folks. The blog contains jokes submitted by readers, new jokes discovered by the author, details about speaking appearances and workshops, and other random bits of information that might be interesting to the strange folks who like math jokes.

MJ4MF (offline version)

Math Jokes 4 Mathy Folks is available from Amazon, Borders, Barnes & Noble, NCTM, Robert D. Reed Publishers, and other purveyors of exceptional literature.

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