Posts tagged ‘7’

Four Score and Seven Dwarfs Ago…

Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs was released 80 years ago today. It was America’s first feature length animated film, the first to be produced in English, and the first in Technicolor. It was the most successful film of 1938, and, when adjusted for inflation, is the tenth highest-grossing film of all time.

Seven Dwarfs

In honor of its anniversary, let’s start with a quiz.

What are the names of the Seven Dwarfs?

If you said Blick, Flick, Glick, Plick, Snick, Whick, and Quee, you’d be correct. What? Of course, those aren’t the names of the dwarfs in the Disney movie, but apparently those were the names used in a 1912 theater adaptation of the original Brothers Grimm fairy tale.

Okay, let’s be a little more fair.

What are the names of the dwarfs in the 1937 Disney movie Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs?

In the image above, left to right, the dwarfs are Bashful, Happy, Dopey, Sleepy, Doc, Grumpy, and Sneezy.

The number seven is ubiquitous, possibly even more popular than Cristiano Ronaldo or Kylie Jenner. Lots of things come in groups of seven, like dwarfs, samurai, games in the World Series, and — appropriate for this time of year — swans a-swimming.

So for your enjoyment, here you go: an entire quiz dedicated to groups of seven.

  1. What are the seven wonders of the world?
  2. What are the seven words you can’t say on TV, according to George Carlin? (NSFW)
  3. What are the Seven Seas?
  4. What are the Seven Habits of Highly Effective People?
  5. Sherwood Schwarz, creator of the TV show Gilligan’s Island, said that each character on the island corresponds to one of the seven deadly sins. Can you name the characters, name the sins, and form a one-to-one correspondence between them?

‘Tis the season of social events. Feel free to use any of those trivia questions at a holiday party near you. And if the crowd at your gathering prefers jokes to quizzes, well, here are a few that involve dwarfs or the number seven:

Why is 6 afraid of 7? Because 7 8 9.

How do you make 7 even? Take away the ‘s’.

Bob has seven daughters, and each daughter has a brother. How many children does Bob have? Eight.

I got in a car crash the other day. A dwarf got out of the other car and said, “I’m not happy.” To which I replied, “Then which one are you?”

And if you need something just a bit more risque…

Why did Happy get out of the hot tub? Because the other dwarfs were feeling happy.

December 21, 2017 at 4:09 pm Leave a comment

All 6’s and 7’s

Tech N9ne has said that the title of his album All 6’s and 7’s means “in a state of confusion and disarray.” Well, of course it does; that’s what it meant when Shakespeare (1595) used the phrase in Richard II…

But time will not permit: all is uneven,
And every thing is left at six and seven.

…that’s what it meant when Chaucer (1380s) used the phrase in Troilus and Criseyde

But manly set the world on sixe and sevene;
And, if thou deye a martir, go to hevene.

…and that’s what it meant when Sirenia (2002) titled their debut album At Sixes and Sevens.

Today, we’re at sixes and sevens, in a sense. The date is 6/7, and this post is all about the many variations of the classic math joke, “Why is 6 afraid of 7?” Think you’ve heard them all? Think again. You’ll be overwhelmed by the sheer number of variations that have been collected from the farthest corners of the web, but hopefully it won’t throw you into a state of disarray and confusion.

(Original)
Why is 6 afraid of 7?
Because 7 8 9.

(Purist)
Why is 10 afraid of 7?
Because 7 8 9.
Some folks claim this makes more sense, since 10 would be next in line.

(Dice)
Why is 6 afraid of 7?
He’s playing craps and his point is 10.

(Turkish)
Why is 5 (bes) afraid of 6 (alti)?
Because 6 (alti) 7 (yedi) 8 (sekiz).
In Turkish, the word for 7 (yedi) is also the word for “ate.”

(Greek)
Why is ε (epsilon) afraid of θ (theta)?
Because ζ (zeta) η (eta) θ (theta).

(Modern)
Why is 6 afraid of 7?
Because he’s a registered six offender.

(Anti-Joke)
Why is 6 afraid of 7?
It isn’t. Numbers are not sentient and therefore are incapable of feeling fear.

(Microsoft)
Why Windows 10?
Because Windows 7 8 9.
This was one of four jokes on the t-shirt worn by Joe Belfiore when presenting new features of Windows 10 at the Build 2015 conference. Microsoft never released a Windows 9 and skipped straight to Windows 10.

(Meta-Joke)
Why don’t jokes work in base 8?
Because 7 10 11.

(Canadian)
Why do Canadians prefer jokes in hexadecimal?
Because 7 8 9 A.

(Star Wars)
Why is Yoda afraid of 7?
Because 6 7 8.
Don’t get it? Say it out loud using your best Yoda voice, and pause briefly after the 6.

(PG-13)
Why did 6 break up with 7?
Because 7 8 9 out.

(Castiel from Supernatural)
Why is 6 afraid of 7?
I assume it’s because 7 is a prime number, and prime numbers can be intimidating.

June 7, 2016 at 7:37 pm 4 comments

Judge This Joke By Its Size, Do You?

Most everyone knows the classic 7-8-9 joke:

What is 6 afraid of 7?
Because 7 8 9.

I recently heard a Star Wars variation:

According to Yoda, why is 5 afraid of 7?
Because 6 7 8.

This joke isn’t funny unless you understand the syntax often used by Yoda, which involves inverting the word order. See www.yodaquotes.net for some examples.

Yoda
There are two other variations that have long been part of my arsenal. My favorite is:

Why don’t jokes work in base 8?
Because 7 10 11.

When I told this joke to my seven-year-old son, he said, “I don’t get it.” I asked him how 7, 10, and 11 would be represented in base 8. He thought for a second then said, “7… 8… oh, yeah… yeah, that works.”

That’s why I call this version a joke grenade. You pull the pin, and five seconds later, people laugh. Well, some people will laugh. Not everyone. I estimate that 5% of the population would understand this joke, and only about 1% would find it funny.

The last variation is multicultural:

What is ε afraid of ζ?
Because ζ η θ.

If you’re thinking, “That’s all Greek to me,” you’re right. The translation is, “Why is epsilon afraid of zeta? Because zeta eta theta.” The Greek alphabet proceeds, in part, as, “…δ (delta), ε (epsilon) ζ (zeta), η (eta), θ (theta), ι (iota)….” But as with all jokes, if it has to be explained to you, then you’re probably not going to find it funny.

July 5, 2014 at 7:08 am 1 comment

A Date of Good Luck

Today is 11/7/13, which is a semi-lucky/lucky/unlucky date.

The numbers in today’s date are 7, 11, and 13, which are the same numbers used in my favorite math trick. I shared that trick on 7/11/13 in A Great Day for a Math Trick — which, honestly, was the best day ever to share it (unless you’re in Europe, in which case today is perfect). For U.S. audiences today, do the division by 11 before the division by 7:

  1. Multiply your age by 12.
  2. Now add the age of your spouse/brother/sister/friend/uncle/aunt/whomever.
  3. This should yield a three-digit number. Now, divide by 11.
  4. Then, divide by 7.
  5. Then, divide by 13.
  6. The result should be a number of the form 0.abcdef…, with a 0 and a decimal point in front of a long string of digits. Add the first six digits after the decimal point.

Here’s the cool part. I don’t know your age, nor do I know the age of your spouse, brother, sister, friend, uncle, or aunt. But I do know that after you completed those steps, this is your result.

Now, how did I know that?

That’s for you to figure out.

Math Major: I’ve found that 67% of Literature majors are stupid.
Literature Major: I’m part of the other 13%.

I was walking past a mental hospital the other day, and all the patients were shouting, “13… 13… 13… 13.” The fence was very high, so I peeked through a little gap in the planks to see what was going on.
Some bastard poked me in the eye with a stick.
Then they all started shouting, “14… 14… 14… 14.”

November 7, 2013 at 11:54 am Leave a comment

A Great Day for a Math Trick

Today is 7/11/13, and boy, have I got a great math trick for today! You’ll likely need a calculator.

  1. Multiply your age by 12.
  2. Now add the age of your spouse/brother/sister/friend/uncle/aunt/whomever.
  3. This should yield a three-digit number. Now, divide by 7.
  4. Then, divide by 11.
  5. Then, divide by 13.
  6. The result should be a number of the form 0.abcdef…, with a 0 and a decimal point in front of a long string of digits. Add the first six digits after the decimal point.

Here’s the cool part. I don’t know your age, nor do I know the age of your spouse, brother, sister, friend, uncle, or aunt. But I do know that after you completed those steps, the result was 27.

Pretty cool, eh?

There are myriad math tricks of this ilk, but this one is my favorite. It’s based on a trick I learned from Art Benjamin, though I think the one above has more panache than his original. Decide for yourself.

  1. Choose a number from 1 to 70, and then divide it by 7.
  2. If your total is a whole number (that is, no digits after the decimal point), divide the answer by 7 again.
  3. Is there a 1 somewhere after the decimal point? I predict that the number after the 1 is 4. Am I right?
  4. Now add up the first six digits after the decimal point.

Just as with the trick above, the result will always be 27.

Regardless of which trick you prefer, have a happy 7/11! And if you’ve got a few hours to kill, you can try to solve the 7‑11 problem.

July 11, 2013 at 7:11 am 5 comments


About MJ4MF

The Math Jokes 4 Mathy Folks blog is an online extension to the book Math Jokes 4 Mathy Folks. The blog contains jokes submitted by readers, new jokes discovered by the author, details about speaking appearances and workshops, and other random bits of information that might be interesting to the strange folks who like math jokes.

MJ4MF (offline version)

Math Jokes 4 Mathy Folks is available from Amazon, Borders, Barnes & Noble, NCTM, Robert D. Reed Publishers, and other purveyors of exceptional literature.

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