The Amazing National Flag of Nepal

June 7, 2017 at 9:38 pm Leave a comment

The National Flag of Nepal is unique.

Nepal Flag

Here are several trivia questions about the Nepalese flag:

  1. It is the only non-quadrilateral national flag in the world. What is its shape?
  2. It is one of only three national flags where the height is not less than the length. What are the other two?
  3. What is the sum of the three acute interior angles within the flag?

Question 3 may be difficult to answer without knowing more about the exact dimensions of the flag. For help with that, we turn to the Constitution of Nepal, promulgated 20 September 2015, which contains the following geometric description for the construction of the flag:

SCHEDULE – 1
The method of making the National Flag of Nepal

  1. Method of making the shape inside the border
    1. On the lower portion of a crimson cloth draw a line AB of the required length from left to right.
    2. From A draw a line AC perpendicular to AB making AC equal to AB plus one third AB. From AC mark off D making the line AD equal to line AB. Join B and D.
    3. From BD mark off E making BE equal to AB.
    4. Touching E draw a line FG, starting from the point F on line AC, parallel to AB to the right hand-side. Mark off FG equal to AB.
    5. Join C and G.

The traditionalist in me wishes that “line segment” were used instead of “line,” or that the overline were used to indicate those segments, and that a few more commas were inserted to make it more readable. Consequently, the math editor in me feels compelled to rewrite the directions as follows:

Nepal Flag Method Math

But the American in me — given how many times someone in the United States has tried to legislate the value of π — well, I’m just excited to see accurate mathematics within a government document.

The description continues for another 19 exhilarating steps, explaining how to construct a crescent moon in the top triangle, a twelve-pointed sun in the bottom triangle, and a border around the shape described above. Those steps are omitted here — because you surely get the gist from what’s above — but the following “explanation” that appears below the method is worthy of examination:

The lines HI, RS, FE, ED, JG, OQ, JK and UV are imaginary. Similarly, the external and internal circles of the sun and the other arcs except the crescent moon are also imaginary. These are not shown on the flag.

The entirety of this construction, as any classical geometrician would hope, can be completed with compass and straightedge. I cheated a bit and used Geometer’s SketchPad, with this being the resultant mess:

Nepal Flag Construction

Geometer’s SketchPad Construction of Nepalese Flag

The rough part was placing C so that AC = AB + 1/3 AB. Geometer’s SketchPad could have easily measured AB, calculated 4/3 of its length, and then constructed a “circle by center and radius,” but that felt like cheating. Instead, I…

  • located Q, which is halfway between A and D;
  • constructed circle A with radius AQ = AP;
  • constructed circle P with radius PD;
  • constructed circle D1 with radius DA;
  • located the intersections of circle P and circle D1 at points X and Y;
  • constructed a line through X and Y;
  • located R, which is 1/3 of the way from D to A;
  • constructed circle D2 with radius DR; and,
  • located C, so that CD = 1/3 AB.

Now, you could use that information to determine CF and FG, and then use the arctan function to calculate the measures of the two acute angles in the upper pennon. If you were so inclined, you’d find that their measures are 32.06° and 57.94°, respectively.

But the question above asked for the sum of the three angle measures. Without any work at all, it’s clear that the sum of those two angles must be 90°, since the construction described above implies that ΔCFG is a right triangle.

And because AB = AD by construction, then ΔDAB is an isosceles right triangle, and the measure of the third acute angle must be 45°.

And that brings us to a good point for revealing the answers to the three questions from above.

  1. Pentagon
  2. The flags of Switzerland and Vatican City are square, so the height and width are equal.
  3. 135°

If you’re looking for more flag-related fun, check out the MJ4MF post from Flag Day 2016 about converting each flag to a pie graph.

Advertisements

Entry filed under: Uncategorized. Tags: , , , , .

A Ton of Money (or Maybe More) Friday Word Puzzle

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Trackback this post  |  Subscribe to the comments via RSS Feed


About MJ4MF

The Math Jokes 4 Mathy Folks blog is an online extension to the book Math Jokes 4 Mathy Folks. The blog contains jokes submitted by readers, new jokes discovered by the author, details about speaking appearances and workshops, and other random bits of information that might be interesting to the strange folks who like math jokes.

MJ4MF (offline version)

Math Jokes 4 Mathy Folks is available from Amazon, Borders, Barnes & Noble, NCTM, Robert D. Reed Publishers, and other purveyors of exceptional literature.

Past Posts

June 2017
M T W T F S S
« May   Jul »
 1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
2627282930  

Enter your email address to subscribe to the MJ4MF blog and receive new posts via email.

Join 287 other followers

Visitor Locations

free counters

%d bloggers like this: